A World of Upstanders Award Recipients

Avenue of the Righteous at Yad Vashem in Jerusalem, Israel.

At Yad Vashem, the Holocaust museum in Jerusalem, Israel, 25,271 people are memorialized as Righteous Among the Nations, non-Jews from 45 countries who saved Jews during the Holocaust.

There has been no similar effort to recognize people who risked their lives to rescue innocent people targeted for extermination since the Holocaust, during the genocides in Cambodia, Rwanda, Bosnia, Guatemala, East Timor; in today’s mass killings in Myanmar, Congo, Central African Republic, Darfur; and many other places.

World Without Genocide is initiating a program called A World of Upstanders: A Program Honoring Rescuers and Prosecutors.  We seek nominations of people who have been ‘upstanders’ in any of these past or current conflicts, either as rescuers who acted to save the lives of others or as prosecutors who sought justice on behalf of those targeted by genocide and mass killing since the Holocaust.

The research and the stories of those who are selected will be archived online for the purposes of research, education, and commemoration.

Nominations are due by April 1, 2016. Upstander selections will be made by the World of Upstanders Committee and announced by April 15. Those chosen will be honored at the World Without Genocide Gala on May 17 in Minneapolis.

Our nomination and selection process will be handled by our Survivors Advisory Council and Benjamin B. Ferencz Fellows in Human Rights and Law, law students who work on issues of international justice.

Quick links:

Download A World of Upstanders background and criteria

Download the Rescuer nomination form

Download the Prosecutor nomination form

 

Upstander Categories:

A person can be considered for selection as an Upstander in two categories[1]:

1. As a rescuer, when information based on survivor testimony or other documentation clearly demonstrates that a person risked his or her life, freedom, and safety to rescue one or several people from the threat of death or other bodily harm during a genocide or mass killing without exacting monetary compensation or other rewards. This applies equally to rescuers who are alive today or who have passed away.

2.  As a prosecutor, when information based on court documentation clearly demonstrates that a lawyer undertook extraordinary steps to bring a perpetrator of genocide or mass killing to justice through international or domestic courts.  This applies equally to lawyers who are alive today or who have passed away.

 

Nomination Criteria:

  1. Nominators should use the official A World of Upstanders submission form.
  2. A person may nominate another or themselves.
  3. Nominations are welcome from anywhere around the globe.
  4. Nominees may be living or deceased.
  5. Nominations should be written in English. If translation assistance is needed, please contact admin@worldwithoutgenocide.org.
  6. Detailed criteria for rescuers and for prosecutors can be found in the accompanying document.
  7. Submissions should include any documents that can authenticate the rescue attempt and the survivors’ fate: official documents from the time; letters or diaries; photographs of survivors and of rescuers, post-conflict correspondence between survivors and their families or between rescuers and their families, post-conflict memoirs or testimonies by survivors; testimony of other people who may have known about the rescue (neighbors, other survivors, etc.); or any other documents that may shed light on the act of rescue and the relationship between rescuers and rescued.
  8. In order to nominate a person for selection of A World of Upstanders, please send the following documentation to admin@worldwithoutgenocide.org

Rescuers:

A. To be considered an upstanding rescuer, an individual must have:

    1. Acted during a genocide[1] or similar atrocity crime[2] since the Holocaust.
    2. Acted at the risk of personal safety and/or freedom to him/herself or to his or her family or loved ones.
    3. Rescued or attempted to rescue or have given shelter, food, medicine, and/or safe passage to one or more individuals (not biologically related) in the targeted group from acts of atrocity[3].
    4. Acted without exacting compensation or other forms of reward.

 B. Submissions should:

    1. Be completed by survivors and/or others who were present and aware of the rescue attempt.
    2. Include all known personal data on rescuers and survivors, a detailed account of the rescue attempt (how the contact with the rescuer was made; the form of rescue; places and dates of rescue; what arrangements or agreements were made between rescuers and survivors; how the danger to the rescuers manifested itself; and any other details that may shed light on the nature of rescue).
    3. Include any documents that can authenticate the rescue attempt and the survivors’ fate: official documents from the time; letters or diaries; photographs of survivors and of rescuers, post-conflict correspondence between survivors and their families or between rescuers and their families; post-conflict memoirs or testimonies by survivors; testimony of other people who may have known about the rescue (neighbors, other survivors, etc.); or any other documents that may shed light on the act of rescue and the relationship between rescuers and rescued.
    4. Be written in English. If translation is needed, please contact admin@worldwithoutgenocide.org.

Prosecutors:

A. To be considered an upstanding prosecutor, an individual must have:

    1. Attempted to bring a perpetrator of genocide[4] or other atrocity crime[5] occurring after the Holocaust to justice.
    2. Prosecuted[6] the accused in a national or international court.

B. Submissions should:

    1. Include any available primary testimonies by others at the court or those directly involved in the case (judges, other lawyers, witnesses, court administrators) with a detailed account of the unique efforts the prosecutor made to successfully prosecute the accused for genocide or other atrocity crimes.
    2. Include any available secondary sources such as books, papers, and other documentation of court proceedings.
    3. Be written in English. If translation is needed, please contact admin@worldwithoutgenocide.org.

 Submission Deadline and Selection:

  • Please submit nominations for rescuers and prosecutors to admin@worldwithoutgenocide.org by April 1.  
  • Upstander selections will be made by March 19 and publicized.
  • Upstanders will be honored at the May 19 World Without Genocide gala.

[1] Genocide: Genocide means any of the following acts committed with intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnical, racial or religious group, as such:

(a) Killing members of the group;

(b) Causing serious bodily or mental harm to members of the group;

(c) Deliberately inflicting on the group conditions of life calculated to bring about its physical destruction in whole or in part;

(d) Imposing measures intended to prevent births within the group;

(e) Forcibly transferring children of the group to another group.

[2] Atrocity crime: an extremely wicked or cruel act including but not limited to: torture, displacement, forced sterilization, rape, sexual violence, forced relocation, starvation, forced disappearance, bodily harm, unlawful detention or incarceration, etc.

[3] Reference footnote 2

[4] Reference footnote 1

[5] Reference footnote 2

[6] Prosecutor: a person who institutes legal proceedings; the legal representative responsible for presenting the case in a criminal trial against an individual accused of a crime. In the context of this criterion, the individual may have been the chief prosecutor or a member of the prosecution team.